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Ted Dexter: Former England Test captain dies aged 86 | Cricket News

Ted Dexter “passed away peacefully” surrounded by family in Wolverhampton after a recent illness; Dexter – an aggressive batsman and part-time medium-pace bowler – played 62 Tests for his country; He went on to captain England, as well as Sussex, during the early 1960s

Last Updated: 26/08/21 9:02am

Ted Dexter passed away after a recent illness surrounded by family in Wolverhampton

Ted Dexter passed away after a recent illness surrounded by family in Wolverhampton

Ted Dexter, the former England Test captain, has died at the age of 86. 

An aggressive batsman and part-time medium-pace bowler, he played 62 Tests for his country, with his debut coming against New Zealand in 1958.

He went on to captain England, as well as Sussex, during the early 1960s, and made his final Test appearance 10 years after his debut – against Australia in 1968.

Dexter “passed away peacefully” surrounded by family in Wolverhampton after a recent illness, the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) announced.

Ted Dexter was inducted into the ICC Hall of Fame in June

Ted Dexter was inducted into the ICC Hall of Fame in June

Its statement read: “MCC is deeply saddened to announce the death of the Club’s much loved former President, Edward Dexter CBE.

“After a recent illness, he passed away peacefully in the Compton Hospice in Wolverhampton at midday yesterday, surrounded by his family.

“Ted was a cherished husband, father and grandfather and one of England’s greatest ever cricketers. He was captain in 30 of his 62 Test matches and played the game with the same sense of adventure and fun that captures much of the story of his remarkable life.

“Through his own PR Agency, he became a pioneer in cricket’s digital technology revolution. In June this year, he was inducted into the ICC Hall of Fame.

“We kindly request that the privacy of Susan, his wife, and Genevieve and Tom, his daughter and son, is respected at this difficult time.”

Dexter is one of only five England batsmen to record a score of 50 in six consecutive innings, an honour he holds with Patsy Hendren, Ken Barrington, Alastair Cook and Joe Root.

The record is seven innings, which only six batsmen in history have managed to achieve – none of which represented England.

Dexter ended his Test career with 4,502 runs at an average of 47.89, while he also took 66 wickets at an average of 34.93.

After retiring, Dexter become chairman of the selection board for the England Test side, a role he held between 1989 and 1993.

He also helped to create the Deloitte Rankings – a method of ranking Test players – in the late 1980s, which went on to be adopted by the International Cricket Council (ICC) and is still in use today as the ICC Player Rankings.

In June, Dexter was inducted into the ICC Hall of Fame.




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